Using the Desert Museum Palo Verde Tree in Your Landscaping

Cercidium “Desert Museum” A great small tree to consider for your landscape Desert Museum Palo Verde Tree video Desert Museum Palo Verde Tree Why use the Desert Museum Palo Verde Tree? It can take our full desert sun It doesn’t need much water It’s fast growing It grows to 25′ x 25′ when mature It’s drought tolerant It has gorgeous yellow flowers Let us know if our certified arborist can answer any of your tree questions or if we can help you with any of your landscaping needs. We can be reached at (520) 370-5697.  Thank you! Arbor Day Proclomation Photo from the City of Tucson’s Mayor & Council meeting where the Mayor signed the Arbor Day Proclamation that the City’s Landscape Advisory Committee that I am a part of and TEP helped to...

Don’t Send Money Down the Drain Water Smart & Save Money This Summer

Most homeowners overwater their yard, unintentionally wasting money every time they take out the hose or turn on the sprinklers. To raise awareness of the benefits of efficient watering practices, the Irrigation Association has named July Smart Irrigation Month. Using an automated irrigation system is one of the best ways to keep your lawn and landscape beautiful and healthy, while minimizing water waste. Make time this summer to be sure you’re getting the most out of your irrigation system, while keeping utility bills low and helping to protect the environment. Smart Start Creating an efficient irrigation system requires specialized knowledge and understanding of irrigation design principles and local environmental conditions — something most weekend gardeners don’t have. Complying with local installation codes is another consideration. Even the best irrigation design won’t perform well if installed incorrectly or using inferior components. Something as simple as selecting the correct type of pipe can mean the difference between a system that lasts and one that requires ongoing repairs. Hiring a certified or licensed irrigation professional and insisting on high-quality components is the smart way to make sure your system will operate at peak efficiency for years to come. Always get multiple bids, check references and confirm your preferred vendor is properly insured. Smart Planning & Planting Guarantee long-term satisfaction with your irrigation system with up-front planning. Work with a certified irrigation designer or contractor who has experience in your local area. Consider local climate conditions, as well as your lot’s exact features. Choose appropriate turf and plant species that have low water requirements. Group plants with similar water needs close together and separate...

Tips for Successful Spring Planting

  Spring Plantings Done Right Spring is my favorite time of the year in the desert because it brings renewal, incredible weather, and outdoor plant color everywhere.  Just look around and you will see nature at its best.  Trees have new leaves and buds, flowers are blooming in every imaginable color, and the Sonoran desert is alive and vibrant.  Spring also brings the best weather for planting.  So, now is the time to consider how you can improve your home’s landscaping. There are certain simple steps that can be taken to ensure that your landscaping is well designed, easy to maintain, and conserves water.  First, look at the area to be landscaped or updated and answer the following questions: Is it in the shade or full sun? Is it near a busy street? Is it adjacent to the natural desert? What does the naturally occurring vegetation surrounding the area consist of? Will there be children playing in the area? Is it a large space or a small space? Once these questions have been answered, a plan can be put together to determine what types of plants, trees, irrigation, and other materials should be used.  Using the correct plants initially will make for a successful project. When choosing trees look for ones that have tapered trunks rather than trunks that are the same size at the top and bottom.  Also, look for trees that have branches and leaves on the lower portion of the trunk.  These assist in photosynthesis and help to strengthen the trunk. Plant size should also be considered when choosing to add plants.  The area to be...

Did you know that there is a Valentine’s Day plant? And, it isn’t a rose.

View this email in your browser Valentine Emu Bush There’s a fantastic shrub that blooms for Valentine’s Day. It grows well in our desert landscapes. And, it’s even called a Valentine bush. It’s the Valentine Emu Bush (Eremophila maculata ‘Valentine’).  This shrub gives you winter color and hummingbirds love it.  Our cooler January through March weather brings on the beautiful bright pink flowers.When it’s not blooming, it stays green and can handle our heat. Another advantage for home landscapes and common areas is that it only gets to be four to five feet tall. So, it can fit in most landscape areas without needing constant maintenance or getting too large for it’s space. If you’re looking for something in blue, the Emu Bush can help you with that too. There is a Blue Bells Emu Bush (Eremophila hygrophana) too!  This is a smaller shrub only growing to two to three feet tall. It can be placed in an even smaller area than the Valentine Emu Bush. It makes a great patio shrub. The Emu bush isn’t just for Valentine’s Day. We can help you if you have a question about a plant. Give us a call at (520) 370-5697 or email me at dmunoz@sonoran-oasis.com. HAVE A VERY HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY! Share Tweet Forward Copyright © 2017 Sonoran Oasis Landscaping, All rights reserved. Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this...

Citrus trees in the desert landscape

View this email in your browser What to know about citrus Part of living in a warm southern climate is being able to enjoy growing winter fruits that our northern friends envy this time of year. Citrus was thought to have been introduced to Arizona in the 1700’s and has long been established as one of Arizona’s 5 C’s (along with copper, cattle, cotton and climate). There are many varieties available in our area, all which have their own ripening season, frost sensitivities and enjoyment factor. Here are a few more facts to help you make the most of your citrus: Some varieties of citrus perform in warm, humid climates, while other varieties such as grapefruit, lemons, mandarins and Valencia oranges prefer long hot summers like in our Southwestern deserts. Nearly all commercially grown citrus are grafted. Cocktail trees are common in backyards, which include 2-3 different grafts, providing an assortment of fruits on one tree. Citrus prefer well-drained soils since some rootstocks are susceptible to a common root rot, Phytophthora which can develop in poorly drained soils. It is recommended for citrus to be fertilized a minimum of 3 times per year: Feb., May and Aug. Monitor weather conditions closely to fine-tune the application timing. Some varieties are alternate bearing: trees produce fruit every other year or heavy one year, light the following year. Citrus require ample water, especially during the heat of summer. Mature trees should be watered every 7-10 days in the summer to the depth of 3 feet in the soil, with the water moving out beyond the tree canopy. Allow tree limbs to grow...

Get your irrigation ready for Spring

  Get your irrigation ready for Spring View this email in your browser Get Your Irrigation Ready for Spring Most of us are ready for the warmer weather of Spring. And, it will be here before you know it. Don’t wait until you have a problem with your irrigation system to deal with it.  A few simple steps will have it ready for the growing season and let you enjoy your Spring garden and landscape. Here’s a great infographic from Rainbird Irrigation with helpful tips to avoid Springtime irrigation problems. This information is for sprinkler systems but it applies to drip irrigation systems too. If you’d like a Rainbird Certified technician to inspect your irrigation system, we can help you. There is no cost for an consultation. We can be reached at (520) 370-5697 to schedule an appointment. Today is National Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Here are some ideas to help you celebrate Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day today. Relieve your stress by poppoing bubble wrap Make a bubble wrap snowy tree (My Favorite) Use bubble wrap as insulation Share Tweet Forward Copyright © 2017 Sonoran Oasis Landscaping, All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: P.O. Box 30937 Tucson, AZ 85751 (520) 370-5697 Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list   This email was sent to <<Email Address>> why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences Sonoran Oasis Landscaping · P.O. Box 30937 · Tucson, Arizona 85751 · USA...

Winter Color

  Best flowers to add winter color to your outdoor spaces View this email in your browser Add Winter Flowers for a Pop of Color Winter can be a bland time in the garden. Most plants are dormant or green and your outdoor spaces can be drab. In Arizona, many days are still nice enough to spend outside. And, you can make your yard more cheery by adding some color. It doesn’t take much room to make a statement. A small planter or a few outdoor pots can create an impact. Here are some flowers that are readily available and will add color to your winter landscape. Marigolds – They can be orange or yellow and grow 15″ to 18″. They don’t require much water and they attract butterflies. They will bloom from December through May. They can take the full sun. Geraniums – These can be orange, red, purple, yellow, pink or white.  They grow 12″ to 18″ tall. They require a lot of water but are easy to grow. They like partial shade.They can bloom into June. Pansies – The colors for pansies are blue, yellow, orange, purple, white, red and pink. They become 6″ to 12″ tall. They like some sun. And,they are edible. They bloom through April and are easy to grow. Petunias – Petunias are blue, yellow, pink, purple and white.They grow from 6″ to 18″ tall. Petunias have a nice fragrance and are easy to grow. They do require a lot of water. They also attract butterflies. You can plant them now and they bloom in March, April and part of May.They do have...

What’s a plant’s real name?

  View this email in your browser Botanical Names and Why They’re Important Have you ever gone to Starbucks and requested a “coffee”? It can be difficult to order something so simple when there are so many options: black, with milk, with cream or sugar.  You can even order the really fancy stuff: Iced Half Caff Venti Ristretto Cinnamon Dolce Soy Skinny Latte, Four Pumps. This can be similar to buying plants at your local nursery. If you don’t know the correct scientific or Latin name, you might be disappointed a few years down the road when your maturing shrub is actually a very large tree. Many people ask why they can’t I use the common name? It’s because many plants have multiple common names, especially if grown in different regions. Let’s look at the sissoo tree, Dalbergia sissoo, which is also called Indian rosewood in our area. Since this tree grows in many places around the world, there are multiple common names: Indian rosewood, East Indian rosewood, dalbergia, Himalaya raintree, penny leaf tree, shisham and sissoo.  Plants can also share common names, such as ‘bird of paradise’, which can refer to a tropical bird of paradise (Strelitzia reginae), a Mexican bird of paradise (Caesalpinia gilliesii) or the red bird of paradise (Caesalpinia pulcherrima). This makes it extremely difficult when shopping for plants by their common name. To make matters even more confusing, we can discuss cultivars and varieties of plant names, which are listed after the Latin name. You’d like to plant a Texas sage, but which one? There are a number of Leucophyllum frutescens, including L. frutescens var. white...

Winter Landscaping Tasks

  Winter landscaping work that makes a difference. View this email in your browser Five Winter Landscaping Maintenance Tasks To Keep Your Yard Looking Great Spring, summer, and fall are all busy seasons for landscaping.  But landscapers can often forget that there are things that can be done in the winter to help keep your landscaping looking good through the rest of the year.  Since the winter is a time when trees and plants growth slows down considerably, there is not much trimming that needs to be done.  But, don’t let this slow down your landscape crew!  There is still plenty to do and the winter is a great time to work on special projects.    Got erosion problems?  Rock jobs such as swale work can be done in the winter.  And, your landscaper will thank you for not waiting for summertime to accomplish this labor-intensive job. Perform a thorough inspection of your existing irrigation system.  Extra time not spent on trimming can be used to work on evaluating and repairing your irrigation system.  And, you’ll likely save money on your water bill once all those pesky little leaks are fixed! Have your major tree trimming done.  The branching of trees can be better seen in the winter when trees have dropped their leaves.  Mistletoe and witches broom are also easier to locate without all the leaves present.  Tree trimmers whose work has slowed down are more likely to give you a better deal, especially when you have multiple trees trimmed. Make plans now for your spring planting.  Don’t wait until February or March to start thinking about planting.  The best time...

Tree roots…What You Can’t See Can Hurt Your Tree

Roots are an important part of your tree. They help to stabilize a tree. They take up water and nutrients from the soil to help your tree grow. They are the one vital part of a tree that you can’t see. They can extend out double the size of your tree’s canopy. Besides all the great things roots do, they can be damaging and problematic at times.  Here are some problems that you may encounter with tree roots: Tree Root Problems Roots that extend under walls, sidewalks, patios or driveways.  Large roots can damage walls, sidewalks, patios and drives by lifting them. One way to avoid this problem is to not plant trees close to these areas.  Give your trees plenty of room for roots to grow. If you do have a problem with roots going under a hardscaped area, you can often cut one root to stop the damage without destabilizing a tree. Cutting more than one can make a tree unstable though. Girdling roots are roots that wrap around the trunk of a tree rather than spreading outward.  This often happens in the nursery pot if a tree is not moved to a bigger pot once it gets too large for its existing pot.  Check for roots coming out of the bottom of a nursery pot when your purchase a tree.  This is one way of knowing that the tree has been in the pot too long.  If the nursery allows you to remove the tree to check the roots, do it.  Look to see if the roots are growing out or wrapping around the trunk.  Once...