The Habits of Mr. Packrat

  View this email in your browser Who’s Invaded My Landscaping? Mr. Pack rat in the Urban Desert This little critter can be a real troublemaker when he finds his way into your desert landscaping. Not only does he make a home in your cactus and bring in shiny and fun trash to furnish his new home, buy viagra pilule he may also decide that your car engine would be a great place to hang out. When he does this, viagra buy he’s likely to use your engine’s wiring as a chew toy. And, that could cost you a lot of money. When I was  16, we moved to Tucson from California, we had a Pontiac Grand Prix that sat for a while in front of our house. This is exactly what we found when we finally tried to start it. A pack rat had moved in and made a home in the Grand Prix’s engine. This would become my car and I wasn’t too happy about him making his home there. Needless to say, this kind of damage can happen fairly quickly. How do you know that you have pack rats other than opening your car hood and finding a nest? Here are some clues: There is a pile of debris in the center of your pickly pear cactus or cholla. Your prickly pear cactus pads are chewed off and moved to a new location. There are leaks in your drip irrigation line that have chew marks in them. You have an owl who has taken up residence in your mesquite tree and comes by daily waiting for...

New Year and New Plants

What’s new in desert landscaping? View this email in your browser What’s New in Desert Plants? Three Great New Plants for Desert Landscapes Are you ready for 2015? It seems like 2014 just started and now the holidays are behind us and we’re looking towards a new year. Are you ready? The nursery industry has been working hard and creating new varieties of plants that will do well in our extreme environment. One of those plants is even from Tucson! It’s the Joan Lionetti Live Oak (Quercus fusiformis ‘Joan Lionetti’ PPAE) from Civano Nursery. Here’s information about this tree and two other great new plant varieties. Joan Lionetti Live Oak – Named after the founder of Trees for Tucson and our own local activist Joan Lionetti. This Live Oak gets to be 30′ x 30′ when mature. It can take full sun or partial shade and cold down to 0 degrees. Perennial Spineless Prickly Pear Tiger Tongue (Opuntia cacanapa ‘Ellisiana’) is a prickly pear cactus that isn’t prickly! It has no spines and can be used in areas where you wouldn’t want to plant a thorny cactus. It has large yellow flowers that bloom in the summer. Tecoma hybrid Solar Flare – This tangerine version of the tecoma is beautiful for Spring to Fall color. It grows to 6′ x 6′ and can handle the cold down to 15 degrees. It does require pruning back after a freeze.  Keep these plants in mind for your desert garden. They each have their own place in the landscape. And, discount viagra here always remember to plant “the right plant in the right place.”...

Cochineal…What is it & What does it do to prickly pear cactus?

Have you heard of cochineal?  Do you know what it is?  It is a scale that prickly pear cactus get.  It looks like white fluff and can cover a small amount or a large area on a prickly pear pad.  It doesn’t hurt the cactus.  But, viagra buy  it can be unsightly.  The native Indians used it as a red dye.  If you rub it between your fingers, viagra generic you will see that it turns red. You can get rid of most of it by spraying your cactus pads with a strong spray of water from a garden hose.  Other than that, there’s not much you can do about it. Watch our short video to find out more about it. Deborah Munoz-Chcaon, Sonoran Oasis...

Where to Get the Best Plants for my Tucson Landscape

No matter what you’re buying, viagra sales  you have choices.  It often seems like you have too many choices.  If you want to buy a hamburger, buy viagra there you can get one from McDonald’s, Burger King, Carl’s Jr., Wendy’s, In-And-Out Burger, Culver’s or many other places.  What drives you to choose one place over another depends on how hungry you are, what the closest burger place is, your like or dislike of a particular burger, and maybe the cost. The same is true for buying plants.  You have lots of choices.  You can even get your Tucson landscaper to buy them for you.  So, why would you choose one place over another?  Here are some reasons. Home Depot and Lowe’s usually have a large amount of a limited selection of plants.  Their prices are generally much less than local nurseries.  And, they will usually take back plants that die as long as you have a receipt and your plant container. So, if you think you might kill your plant, get it from one of these garden centers. Small independent nurseries like Magic Garden, Green Things and Rillito Nursery have a somewhat larger selection of plants and trees and can provide you with personal attention.  They are always happy to answer your questions and offer suggestions. Larger Tucson plant nurseries such as Mesquite Valley Growers, Silverbell Nursery and Civano Nursery have a much larger selection of plants and trees that you may not find anywhere else.  And, if they don’t have it, they can get it for you.  They are often very busy and may not be able to...

Thorns, Spines and Prickles

If you’ve ever hiked in the desert, discount viagra  you know that you have to watch where you walk.  Our desert is beautiful but it comes with some hazards.  Most desert plants and trees protect themselves with thorns, spines or prickles.  They’ve developed these as a way to survive in our oftentimes harsh environment. I love the desert and I spend a lot of my time outdoors for my business and for my leisure time.  And, even when I’m very careful, I’ve been stuck by tree thorns or cactus spines.  Sometimes, you just can’t get out of their way.  This is why I usually wear long sleeved shirts, pants, and boots.  The more you’re covered, the less likely you are to get hurt. Did you know there is a difference between thorns,spines and prickles? Thorns are modified branches and  stems. Spines are modified leaves. And, prickles are extensions a plant’s epidermis – like hairs. You find thorns on trees such as the ones on mesquite trees.  Spines or glochids are the small hairy fuzz found on some cactus.  And, prickles are what you find on roses.  Thorns and prickles are much easier to remove from your skin than spines.  Spines are hard to see and often embed themselves in your skin to a point where you know they’re there but can’t remove them.  They eventually work their way out of your skin but it can take awhile.  Your best line of defense is to keep far enough away from thorny, spiny, and prickly plants that you don’t get stuck by them.  Next would be to keep hand sanitizer and...

Did You Know? Interesting Desert Plant Facts

The Sonoran Desert is a very unique place unlike most other parts of the world.  And, best viagra there are lots of interesting adaptations by plants to survive in our harsh climate.  Here are just a few that you may not have known. DO YOU KNOW WHY THE PALO VERDE TREE HAS A GREEN TRUNK AND BRANCHES? It’s to help the tree with photosynthesis.  When there is a drought, advice the palo verde tree will drop it’s leaves.  At these times, it relies on the trunk and branches to take on the roll of photosynthesis.  And, did you know that the Palo Verde tree is Arizona’s state tree? WHY DOES THE SAGUARO GROW ARMS? The arms grow to help with reproduction (growth of flowers and fruit). DOES CHOLLA ACTUALLY JUMP? A slight touch or brush of your clothes near a cholla will cause the end stems to detach from the plant.  This helps disperse the plant to new areas to grow.  Although it appears to jump, cholla cactus stems just come off very easily. DOES A CENTURY PLANT ACTUALLY LIVE FOR 100 YEARS? No.  A century plant actually lives for approximately 20 to 30 years.  It only blooms once and then it dies. IS DESERT MISTLETOE THE SAME AS CHRISTMAS MISTLETOE? No.  These are different varieties of mistletoe and are more like cousins.  Desert mistletoe is stringy and thin. It’s not velvety and soft like Christmas mistletoe.  You’d be doing a lot of kissing if you kissed someone under every desert tree with mistletoe you walked under. We hope you enjoyed this post and maybe even learned something you didn’t...