Winter Color

  Best flowers to add winter color to your outdoor spaces View this email in your browser Add Winter Flowers for a Pop of Color Winter can be a bland time in the garden. Most plants are dormant or green and your outdoor spaces can be drab. In Arizona, many days are still nice enough to spend outside. And, you can make your yard more cheery by adding some color. It doesn’t take much room to make a statement. A small planter or a few outdoor pots can create an impact. Here are some flowers that are readily available and will add color to your winter landscape. Marigolds – They can be orange or yellow and grow 15″ to 18″. They don’t require much water and they attract butterflies. They will bloom from December through May. They can take the full sun. Geraniums – These can be orange, red, purple, yellow, pink or white.  They grow 12″ to 18″ tall. They require a lot of water but are easy to grow. They like partial shade.They can bloom into June. Pansies – The colors for pansies are blue, yellow, orange, purple, white, red and pink. They become 6″ to 12″ tall. They like some sun. And,they are edible. They bloom through April and are easy to grow. Petunias – Petunias are blue, yellow, pink, purple and white.They grow from 6″ to 18″ tall. Petunias have a nice fragrance and are easy to grow. They do require a lot of water. They also attract butterflies. You can plant them now and they bloom in March, April and part of May.They do have...

Time to hard prune frost-damaged plants

Got brown ugly or woody plants? Many plants can be hard pruned. What does hard pruning mean? It’s cutting back plants to about six inches above ground level to rejuvenate them. Each winter plants like lantana and red birds-of-paradise freeze back and become brown. They often look dead. But, viagra sovaldi they’re not. The brown dead-looking exterior protects the lower sections and roots of the plants. So, viagra sales cure you don’t want to trim them back in the fall or winter because you’re removing the protective covering. Hard-pruning is also good for shrubs that have become woody and don’t have many leaves or flowers. They may be older shrubs or ones that have been continually sheared. Taking back Texas Rangers and oleanders can help them grow back full and reduce maintenance on them. March is the best time to do hard pruning in the desert. The winter is over and it’s not summertime hot yet. Enjoy our spring weather and watch your hard-pruned plants come back looking better than they did before. Tucson landscaper succeeds with focus on HOA clients I am honored to have been selected as one of the Total Landscape Care Magazine’s finalists for Landscaper of the Year for 2015. You can read the article from the magazine that they wrote about us here. The United Nations began celebrating International Women’s Day (IWD) on 8 March during International Women’s Year 1975. Two years later, buy cialis in December 1977, the General Assembly adopted a resolution proclaiming a United Nations Day for Women’s Rights and International Peace to be observed on any day of the year by...

Keeping your plants safe from the cold weather

View this email in your browser We are now in the thick of winter. Since many of our landscape plants are considered tropical or sub-tropical, cialis sales sick we begin seeing frost damage on plants, ambulance like Lantana, when temperature hit the low 30’s, while other plant don’t show damage until temperatures have been below freezing for a number of hours. Frost blankets seem to be the favorite choice in our region, providing up to 8-9 degrees of protection. However, they are often used incorrectly. Here are a few helpful hints to make sure you are using protective frost blankets correctly: Use cloth or paper, never use plastic! Sheets or blankets, must be removed daily Frost cloth can be left on for a few days Drape plant from top all the way to the ground Do not allow any openings (trap heat rising from ground under cloth) Do not gather the drape around trunk Allow drape to cover all the way out to drip line, if possible Wrap trunks of young citrus trees loosely to the ground (can be left all winter) Additional steps to help protect your plants from the cold: Lights, Christmas lights at bottom of plant can radiate heat Water under canopy adds heat: when water cools, energy is released=heat! Don’t Fertilize- new growth is more sensitive to frost damage Don’t Prune- don’t prune sensitive plants until after treat of frost (late Feb.) Don’t Overprotect- allow plants to harden off, gradually exposed to cold weather   PROTECT YOUR LANDSCAPE INVESTMENT!   THIS LANDSCAPING TIP brought to you by the Arizona Landscape Contractors’ Association.   www.ALCA.org ARIZONA LANDSCAPE CONTRACTORS AWARDS We were...

Cold Weather Plant Care

Everyone thinks about how the heat affects plants in the desert…but how many of us consider the effects of frost-damage to our desert plants?  This time of year is a good time to consider how to protect our frost-tender plants from freezing when the temperature dips below 32 degrees F. When the temperature drops you can do several things to help ensure that your frost-tender plants and trees do not freeze.  Cover canopies of trees with a coverings made specifically to cover plants and trees.  You can buy these covers  from your local nursery, cialis usa  Ace Hardware or other home improvement store.  They are available at this time of the year and you can find them in the garden department.  It is also a good idea to cover the base of your tree at the ground level of the trunk.  This offers additional protection of roots and can help if you are unable to cover your tree canopy.  Plants and trees should be covered before the sun goes down to gather the sunlight heat from the day and to offer a slightly warmer temperature under the cover than would otherwise be available if the plant is covered after sunset. Leave the cover on until the temperature warms in the morning. Another thing you can do to protect trees is adding a light under your plant’s protective covering.  Keep the light away from the trunk of trees because they can burn the trunk.  Also, ensure that the light does not touch the covering because light bulbs can get hot and burn material.  And, always make sure that your plants and...

How Your Plants Respond to the Cold

Saturday was the coldest day this  Fall in Tucson.  63 degrees might be considered warm in other parts of the country this time of year, best cialis order but in Arizona, it’s downright cold.  And, when it’s cold for us that means it’s cold for your plants.  The only difference is that your plants have to remain outside all night while you get to spend time in your warm house. When the weather cools off, your plants know that it’s time to prepare for the winter.  What does that mean?  It means that: Your plants will require less water.  Here’s a great resource for figuring out how much to water your plants and trees during the winter.  Watering by the Numbers Unless your plants are winter blooming plants,  most will start going dormant and turning brown and losing their flowers.  This does not mean that they are dead.  This change helps them to survive the winter.  The roots remain alive and are kept warm by the dormant branches above ground.  So, don’t cut down your plants this time of year.  Wait until after the last winter freeze to protect your plants roots. Have frost cover sheets available to use to cover your frost tender plants so they don’t freeze and die if the weather gets very cold.  You can purchase these from any Home Depot or Lowe’s Home Improvement Store.  Landscape Plants for the Arizona Desert shows the Hardiness Level (the lowest temperature the plants can take before freezing) for common desert plants.  Make sure to remove the covers during the day. Follow these easy steps to keep your landscape...

Pruning Back Plants in Desert Landscapes

March is here and we’re getting warmer weather in Tucson.  Do you have plants that were damaged this winter and have a lot of dead leaves and branches on them?  Or, tadalafil do you have older shrubs that have gotten woody and scraggly?  Then, now is the time to do some hard-pruning. You might be wondering what exactly is “hard-pruning.”  Sort of sounds like using a big rock to prune your shrubs.  Not exactly something you would want to do to your desert landscaping plants!  Hard-pruning involves pruning back a shrub to about 1″ to 6″ above ground level.  This helps to rejuvenate an older shrub or get a winter cold weather damaged shrub ready for spring. Some shrubs respond better to hard-pruning than others.  Oleanders and Texas Rangers do very well when pruned back to just above ground level.  Hopbush plants respond fairly well too. You want to make sure to do this type of trimming at the beginning of spring.  If you wait until later, it is too hot in Tucson to do it.  Your plants have the tendency to burn and die if you do this  in the summer.  They can freeze and die if you perform this type of trimming in the fall or winter.  Cassia shrubs don’t always recover from hard-pruning.  When they do, they often take a lot longer to recover from the pruning.  You may not see much new growth until the second year after they have been pruned. Some plants such as lantana plants need to be severely pruned back in the early spring to remove winter damage on branches and leaves.  This time of year you will notice...