Citrus trees in the desert landscape

View this email in your browser What to know about citrus Part of living in a warm southern climate is being able to enjoy growing winter fruits that our northern friends envy this time of year. Citrus was thought to have been introduced to Arizona in the 1700’s and has long been established as one of Arizona’s 5 C’s (along with copper, cattle, cotton and climate). There are many varieties available in our area, all which have their own ripening season, frost sensitivities and enjoyment factor. Here are a few more facts to help you make the most of your citrus: Some varieties of citrus perform in warm, humid climates, while other varieties such as grapefruit, lemons, mandarins and Valencia oranges prefer long hot summers like in our Southwestern deserts. Nearly all commercially grown citrus are grafted. Cocktail trees are common in backyards, which include 2-3 different grafts, providing an assortment of fruits on one tree. Citrus prefer well-drained soils since some rootstocks are susceptible to a common root rot, Phytophthora which can develop in poorly drained soils. It is recommended for citrus to be fertilized a minimum of 3 times per year: Feb., May and Aug. Monitor weather conditions closely to fine-tune the application timing. Some varieties are alternate bearing: trees produce fruit every other year or heavy one year, light the following year. Citrus require ample water, especially during the heat of summer. Mature trees should be watered every 7-10 days in the summer to the depth of 3 feet in the soil, with the water moving out beyond the tree canopy. Allow tree limbs to grow...

Winter Color

  Best flowers to add winter color to your outdoor spaces View this email in your browser Add Winter Flowers for a Pop of Color Winter can be a bland time in the garden. Most plants are dormant or green and your outdoor spaces can be drab. In Arizona, many days are still nice enough to spend outside. And, you can make your yard more cheery by adding some color. It doesn’t take much room to make a statement. A small planter or a few outdoor pots can create an impact. Here are some flowers that are readily available and will add color to your winter landscape. Marigolds – They can be orange or yellow and grow 15″ to 18″. They don’t require much water and they attract butterflies. They will bloom from December through May. They can take the full sun. Geraniums – These can be orange, red, purple, yellow, pink or white.  They grow 12″ to 18″ tall. They require a lot of water but are easy to grow. They like partial shade.They can bloom into June. Pansies – The colors for pansies are blue, yellow, orange, purple, white, red and pink. They become 6″ to 12″ tall. They like some sun. And,they are edible. They bloom through April and are easy to grow. Petunias – Petunias are blue, yellow, pink, purple and white.They grow from 6″ to 18″ tall. Petunias have a nice fragrance and are easy to grow. They do require a lot of water. They also attract butterflies. You can plant them now and they bloom in March, April and part of May.They do have...

Three Easy Ways to Use Drainage to Help Water Your Plants

It’s summertime in the desert and it looks like the monsoon season is here!  Now that we’re getting rain, viagra canada  how can use use the rain water rather than having it run off your property into the street?   #1 – One easy way to divert water to your plants is to create drainage swales using river rock.  The water drains off your roof and runs down the river rock to your plants and trees.  All that’s required is digging a trench to direct the water to your plants and adding the rock. #2 – Water harvesting barrels.  Using water harvesting barrels to collect water from your roof to be stored and used later is another easy way to keep water on your property.  This is more costly than just adding swales but can save you money over time in water savings. #3 – Create a water garden.  A small basin lower than the level of the rest of your yard with plants and trees in it that can catch water and hold it in your yard.  Make sure that any excess water does not stand in the basin because  this can encourage mosquito problems.  A water garden can be combined with swales to divert water to the water garden. Remember that July is Smart Irrigation Month.  Using rainwater is a good way to conserve your irrigation water when we get the monsoon rains.  Every little bit helps.  If you’re looking for more ways to save money on your irrigation water bill, contact us at (520) 370-5697 for...

Salts Can Damage Plants

  Salts in our desert water can damage plants. Here’s what you need to know about them. View this email in your browser July is Smart Irrigation month It’s a great time to think about how efficiently we are watering our plants. You’ve heard it all before, viagra sales but we will say it once more: it is best to water your plants deeply, cialis usa meaning less frequent cycles, yet longer run times. There are many benefits to watering plants deeply, including: Encouraging deeper root systems which anchor better in soil, improved tolerance in drought conditions (such as irrigation outages or failures) It helps to leach salt build-up in the soil. Excess salt in soil can greatly impact the overall growth and health of our plants.     (Photos of what salt accumulation looks like) Here are a few facts on salts in the landscape: Where do these salts come from? Generally speaking, arid regions tend to be alkaline and salty due to the dry climate and high temperatures leading to fast evaporation. We do not receive enough water to ‘leach’ or push the salts past plant’s root zones. We also have salty water sources.  Ever wonder why they named it the ‘Salt River’?  Reclaimed water tends to be higher in sodium, which can be toxic to plants. Plus, we tend to water our plants shallowly (short, frequent intervals) which can increase salt levels in the upper soil profile. Should I be concerned with salt in my soil? Yes, especially if you are growing non-native plants or salt-sensitive plants. Salt sensitive plants tend to demonstrate leaf tip burn in...

When and how to split perennial plants

View this email in your browser Properly split perennials Did you know that you can split some perennial plants?  This can make them grow better and give you multiple plants. There are signs that indicate it may be time to split your perennials. For example, viagra if an established perennial plant produces fewer flowers or the center of the plant looks sickly while the outer edges are doing well, cialis usa it could be time to divide the plant and replant it in another bed or in a container. In our warmer climate, exposure to hot temperatures can damage divided plants, so fall is a better time to divide because it allows them to become established during the mild winter. If possible, divide perennials before cool, rainy weather is forecasted. These conditions will help the plants recover from the stress of being split and replanted. So, look at your perennial plants now to think about which ones may need to be divided in the fall. If the ground is dry when you plan to divide the plant, prepare the area by thoroughly soaking the soil around the plant. Let it drain. Note that some plants are best left undivided. These include monkshood, false indigo, bleeding heart, lupine, peony and poppy to name some. Follow these three steps to properly split a perennial. Step 1 Dig up the entire plant. Step 2 Place the plant on a tarp in a shady spot and observe the roots. Some perennials have roots that separate easily, while others are tangled and more difficult. Some have fleshy roots that will need to be sliced into sections....

Helping our bee pollinators with plants

  Plants for Pollination We’ve all heard about the problems that bees are having. Pesticides, cialis viruses, discount cialis parasites, pathogens and lack of habitat are making it harder for bees to survive. They are an especially important part of our ecosystem because they pollinate many of the plants that provide food to us. What can we do individually to help bees and other pollinators? It seems like the problem is bigger than us. But, one easy thing we can do is to plant the plants that attract bees. Giving them more food sources is a step in the right direction to help bees. Bees prefer plants that have bright white, yellow or blue flowers that are shallow and have a platform shape that they can land on. Here are some of the desert plants that attract bees. Consider planting some of them when adding plants to your landscape. Blackfoot Daisy (Melampodium leucanthum) Penstemon (Penstemon spp.) Bee Brush (Aloysia gratissima) Foothills Palo Verde (Parkinsonia microphylla) Bee Balm (Monarda fistulosa) Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata) These are just some of the plants and trees that attract bees. Often you will see lots of bees on plants that have blooming flowers. They generally leave after the flowers are finished blooming. A good resource is the guide for selecting plants for pollinators. Let us know if you have any questions about plants that attract pollinators. We’re here to help you. We can be reached at (520) 370-5697 or email us at dmunoz@sonoran-oasis.com.               One of our crew leaders, Alfred Camacho, recently completed and passed the Sustainable Landscape Management (SLM) program through ALCA and is...