What’s Wrong With My Tree?

Tree Problems Trees offer shade and are an important asset to a property. You should know the common problems that desert trees have so that you will know them when you see them. It’s the best way to resolve an issue fast. Let’s Get Started Improper Pruning If you’re going to leave a big stub with a little bit of branches coming off of it, remove it. Don’t do this. Mistletoe Mistletoe is a big problem in desert trees. The dark spots in this tree are clumps of mistletoe. It is a parasite that is carried from tree to tree by birds. It will often take hold in a tree that is already stressed, diseased or declining. So, if you see this, the tree already has problems . Wrong Tree Wrong Place Having a tree planted too close to a building, wall, sidewalk or driveway will cause roots to start lifting the wall, sidewalk or drive. Roots can also cause sewer problems. And, that can become a costly repair. Plus, lifted sidewalks are a trip hazard. Always plant a tree with enough room to grow. Remember that a tree’s roots grow to approximately double the size of it’s canopy. We Can Answer Your Tree Questions These are just a few of the problems that you may encounter with trees. Call us at (520) 370-5697 if we can answer any of your tree questions or help you with your properties trees. Our on-staff International Society of Arboriculture Certified Arborist is happy to help you. Deborah Munoz-Chacon Sonoran Oasis Landscaping ISA Certified Arborist #WE-6083A www.sonoran-oasis.com Copyright © 2017 Sonoran Oasis Landscaping,...

Using the Desert Museum Palo Verde Tree in Your Landscaping

Cercidium “Desert Museum” A great small tree to consider for your landscape Desert Museum Palo Verde Tree video Desert Museum Palo Verde Tree Why use the Desert Museum Palo Verde Tree? It can take our full desert sun It doesn’t need much water It’s fast growing It grows to 25′ x 25′ when mature It’s drought tolerant It has gorgeous yellow flowers Let us know if our certified arborist can answer any of your tree questions or if we can help you with any of your landscaping needs. We can be reached at (520) 370-5697.  Thank you! Arbor Day Proclomation Photo from the City of Tucson’s Mayor & Council meeting where the Mayor signed the Arbor Day Proclamation that the City’s Landscape Advisory Committee that I am a part of and TEP helped to...

Citrus trees in the desert landscape

View this email in your browser What to know about citrus Part of living in a warm southern climate is being able to enjoy growing winter fruits that our northern friends envy this time of year. Citrus was thought to have been introduced to Arizona in the 1700’s and has long been established as one of Arizona’s 5 C’s (along with copper, cattle, cotton and climate). There are many varieties available in our area, all which have their own ripening season, frost sensitivities and enjoyment factor. Here are a few more facts to help you make the most of your citrus: Some varieties of citrus perform in warm, humid climates, while other varieties such as grapefruit, lemons, mandarins and Valencia oranges prefer long hot summers like in our Southwestern deserts. Nearly all commercially grown citrus are grafted. Cocktail trees are common in backyards, which include 2-3 different grafts, providing an assortment of fruits on one tree. Citrus prefer well-drained soils since some rootstocks are susceptible to a common root rot, Phytophthora which can develop in poorly drained soils. It is recommended for citrus to be fertilized a minimum of 3 times per year: Feb., May and Aug. Monitor weather conditions closely to fine-tune the application timing. Some varieties are alternate bearing: trees produce fruit every other year or heavy one year, light the following year. Citrus require ample water, especially during the heat of summer. Mature trees should be watered every 7-10 days in the summer to the depth of 3 feet in the soil, with the water moving out beyond the tree canopy. Allow tree limbs to grow...

Winter Landscaping Tasks

  Winter landscaping work that makes a difference. View this email in your browser Five Winter Landscaping Maintenance Tasks To Keep Your Yard Looking Great Spring, summer, and fall are all busy seasons for landscaping.  But landscapers can often forget that there are things that can be done in the winter to help keep your landscaping looking good through the rest of the year.  Since the winter is a time when trees and plants growth slows down considerably, there is not much trimming that needs to be done.  But, don’t let this slow down your landscape crew!  There is still plenty to do and the winter is a great time to work on special projects.    Got erosion problems?  Rock jobs such as swale work can be done in the winter.  And, your landscaper will thank you for not waiting for summertime to accomplish this labor-intensive job. Perform a thorough inspection of your existing irrigation system.  Extra time not spent on trimming can be used to work on evaluating and repairing your irrigation system.  And, you’ll likely save money on your water bill once all those pesky little leaks are fixed! Have your major tree trimming done.  The branching of trees can be better seen in the winter when trees have dropped their leaves.  Mistletoe and witches broom are also easier to locate without all the leaves present.  Tree trimmers whose work has slowed down are more likely to give you a better deal, especially when you have multiple trees trimmed. Make plans now for your spring planting.  Don’t wait until February or March to start thinking about planting.  The best time...

When to Stake Trees and How to Do It

THIS LANDSCAPING TIP brought to you by the Arizona Landscape Contractors’ Association, cialis sale www.ALCA.org, the Arizona Certified Landscape Professional program and the Sustainable Landscape Management program. It may seem far off but monsoon season is right around the corner. We all know the consequences of strong winds to our landscape trees: broken limbs, uprooted, emergency calls when a tree is in the roadway, or worse, on someone’s car! Now is the perfect time to inspect tree stakes in the landscape to prepare and prevent landscape catastrophes if those nasty storms steer into your community. If trees have been in the ground for more than one year, determine whether the stakes should be removed. Roots should have grown into surrounding soils, providing a firm anchor into the soil. Check wires and hoses around trunks to make sure there is plenty of room for the tree to move. If the wire and hose are too tight on the trunk, it can begin girdling the tree, preventing water and nutrient flow that can create a weak spot and can potentially snap off in strong winds. Ensure wires or stakes are not rubbing or damaging any branches that may contact the tree as it moves in the wind. Make adjustments if necessary. If older or outdated staking methods such as metal stakes, re-bar, or guy wires were used, consider removing or replacing with traditional staking, such as the conventional two-stake method, for public safety and the well-being of the tree. Parallel to street stake positioning doesn’t always provide the best tree support. Stakes should be positioned at 90 degrees to prevailing winds....

Trees for You

  TEP’s Trees for You Program Tucson Electric Power and Civano Nursery are working together this year to provide homeowners and businesses with low cost native and desert adapted trees. Trees help to cool your home and business in the summer. You can purchase up to three five-gallon trees for $5.00 each or fifteen-gallon trees for $15.00 each. You can order the trees directly from your TEP account online and pick up your trees from one of four local nurseries. Participating nurseries include Harlow Gardens, viagra sales Rillito Nursery, Civano Nursery and Native Gardens of Green Valley. Tree placement requirements include planting your trees on the south, east or west side of your home or building within fifteen feet of the structure. This is a great program and a fantastic deal on the purchase of trees. TEP’s program and Civano Nursery are adding new tree species every month.  Take advantage of the program and enhance your property while saving money on your summer electric bill.  You can get detailed information here. Did you know that today is Lucky Penny Day? Can you even think of anything you can buy for a penny today?  I know that I can’t.  You used to be able to buy items with a penny. But, that time seems to be gone.  Pennies actually cost more to produce than their face value.  Do you think this makes them obsolete? And, should they be eliminated from our currency? My five-year old grandson enjoys making a wish and throwing pennies into fountains. That’s one use for them. But, take today to think about all those loose pennies jiggling...