January Special Landscaping Offer – 10% off all rock work

  January Landscaping Special New Year New Rock Start the new year off with: A fresh coat or new covering of crushed rock River rock swales to help alleviate standing water and to divert it to your plants and trees Catalina rock to stop erosion on slopes and give your landscape a finished look This January landscaping special runs through the end of January.  Call (520) 370-5697 or email us at dmunoz@sonoran-oasis.com for a free estimate.  Just approve and schedule your rock work by January 31, 2018 to receive this offer. Share Tweet Forward Copyright © 2018  Sonoran Oasis Landscaping, All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: P.O. Box 30937 Tucson, AZ 85751 (520) 370-5697 Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.  ...

New Year – New Landscaping

View this email in your browser New Year – New Landscaping The New year is a time to start fresh.  Whether it’s improving your health, your finances, or your landscaping, there are always ways to make things better. Some improvements that make a difference can be small. And, some can be really big. When it comes to your landscaping, there are lots of ways to make it better.  For a new landscape start with a plan. Rather than randomly adding plants consider what you’d like your outdoor space to look like and how you will use it.  Starting with a design can help you envision the finished project and changes made on paper won’t cost you the time and money installing and removing bad choices will cost you in your yard. Want to freshen up your garden or landscape? If you have an existing landscape or garden, you can make it more exciting and colorful by strategically adding and/or removing plants and trees.  This is less costly than starting over. And, you have the advantage of having mature plants that will give your landscape a finished look from the start. Is your landscaping looking a little drab? You can make it look cleaner and brighter by freshening up your existing crushed rock or decomposed granite.  Both types of rock become thin with regular blowing and raking over time.  Adding more fills in the bare spots and improves the color.  Another easy fix is to remove and reset any river rock or Catalina rock that is starting to get covered by dirt and displaced from people, pets and rain. Do...

Using the Desert Museum Palo Verde Tree in Your Landscaping

Cercidium “Desert Museum” A great small tree to consider for your landscape Desert Museum Palo Verde Tree video Desert Museum Palo Verde Tree Why use the Desert Museum Palo Verde Tree? It can take our full desert sun It doesn’t need much water It’s fast growing It grows to 25′ x 25′ when mature It’s drought tolerant It has gorgeous yellow flowers Let us know if our certified arborist can answer any of your tree questions or if we can help you with any of your landscaping needs. We can be reached at (520) 370-5697.  Thank you! Arbor Day Proclomation Photo from the City of Tucson’s Mayor & Council meeting where the Mayor signed the Arbor Day Proclamation that the City’s Landscape Advisory Committee that I am a part of and TEP helped to...

Don’t Send Money Down the Drain Water Smart & Save Money This Summer

Most homeowners overwater their yard, unintentionally wasting money every time they take out the hose or turn on the sprinklers. To raise awareness of the benefits of efficient watering practices, the Irrigation Association has named July Smart Irrigation Month. Using an automated irrigation system is one of the best ways to keep your lawn and landscape beautiful and healthy, while minimizing water waste. Make time this summer to be sure you’re getting the most out of your irrigation system, while keeping utility bills low and helping to protect the environment. Smart Start Creating an efficient irrigation system requires specialized knowledge and understanding of irrigation design principles and local environmental conditions — something most weekend gardeners don’t have. Complying with local installation codes is another consideration. Even the best irrigation design won’t perform well if installed incorrectly or using inferior components. Something as simple as selecting the correct type of pipe can mean the difference between a system that lasts and one that requires ongoing repairs. Hiring a certified or licensed irrigation professional and insisting on high-quality components is the smart way to make sure your system will operate at peak efficiency for years to come. Always get multiple bids, check references and confirm your preferred vendor is properly insured. Smart Planning & Planting Guarantee long-term satisfaction with your irrigation system with up-front planning. Work with a certified irrigation designer or contractor who has experience in your local area. Consider local climate conditions, as well as your lot’s exact features. Choose appropriate turf and plant species that have low water requirements. Group plants with similar water needs close together and separate...

Tips for Successful Spring Planting

  Spring Plantings Done Right Spring is my favorite time of the year in the desert because it brings renewal, incredible weather, and outdoor plant color everywhere.  Just look around and you will see nature at its best.  Trees have new leaves and buds, flowers are blooming in every imaginable color, and the Sonoran desert is alive and vibrant.  Spring also brings the best weather for planting.  So, now is the time to consider how you can improve your home’s landscaping. There are certain simple steps that can be taken to ensure that your landscaping is well designed, easy to maintain, and conserves water.  First, look at the area to be landscaped or updated and answer the following questions: Is it in the shade or full sun? Is it near a busy street? Is it adjacent to the natural desert? What does the naturally occurring vegetation surrounding the area consist of? Will there be children playing in the area? Is it a large space or a small space? Once these questions have been answered, a plan can be put together to determine what types of plants, trees, irrigation, and other materials should be used.  Using the correct plants initially will make for a successful project. When choosing trees look for ones that have tapered trunks rather than trunks that are the same size at the top and bottom.  Also, look for trees that have branches and leaves on the lower portion of the trunk.  These assist in photosynthesis and help to strengthen the trunk. Plant size should also be considered when choosing to add plants.  The area to be...

Citrus trees in the desert landscape

View this email in your browser What to know about citrus Part of living in a warm southern climate is being able to enjoy growing winter fruits that our northern friends envy this time of year. Citrus was thought to have been introduced to Arizona in the 1700’s and has long been established as one of Arizona’s 5 C’s (along with copper, cattle, cotton and climate). There are many varieties available in our area, all which have their own ripening season, frost sensitivities and enjoyment factor. Here are a few more facts to help you make the most of your citrus: Some varieties of citrus perform in warm, humid climates, while other varieties such as grapefruit, lemons, mandarins and Valencia oranges prefer long hot summers like in our Southwestern deserts. Nearly all commercially grown citrus are grafted. Cocktail trees are common in backyards, which include 2-3 different grafts, providing an assortment of fruits on one tree. Citrus prefer well-drained soils since some rootstocks are susceptible to a common root rot, Phytophthora which can develop in poorly drained soils. It is recommended for citrus to be fertilized a minimum of 3 times per year: Feb., May and Aug. Monitor weather conditions closely to fine-tune the application timing. Some varieties are alternate bearing: trees produce fruit every other year or heavy one year, light the following year. Citrus require ample water, especially during the heat of summer. Mature trees should be watered every 7-10 days in the summer to the depth of 3 feet in the soil, with the water moving out beyond the tree canopy. Allow tree limbs to grow...